REM Rebound effect

Discussion in 'Sleep Apnea & CPAP Users Forum' started by chichi, Apr 23, 2017.

  1. chichi

    chichi New Member

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    I am using the IntelliPAP AutoAdjust Travel CPAP Machine with SmartFlex, Swift FX Nasal Pillow CPAP Mask with Headgear. My humidifier is IntelliPAP Integrated Heated Humidifier and I have the CMS 50D+ Oximeter.

    It has been four months now and I found my CPAP to be of great help. Over the past month or so, a seemingly increasing level of fatigue has been worrying me a lot. Though it's nothing as bad as it was before I started the CPAP therapy, I was very concerned as to what could be wrong.

    I feel tired all day and it's quite like I were yet to wake up out of the REM state I must have been in, in my sleep. At present the readings are AHI 0.5 - 0.0, confirmed by oximeter data, no desats. It's as if I've been drugged into sleep. Until I've been put on the CPAP, I had never had REM or even much of dreams even.

    Neither my body nor the mind has known anything like the kind of sleep state I am experiencing now. I find it really hard to wake up completely and come into the real world for quite some time after getting up.

    Is this going to improve with time? Hopefully, any time soon?
     
  2. Magdalina

    Magdalina New Member

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    I had experienced REM rebound around week 4 of CPAP treatment, exactly like they told me I would. They also told me it would last a couple of weeks and that was how long it lasted for me.

    It has been close to five months now and I have had no relapse with tiredness at all.
     
  3. MikeWest

    MikeWest New Member

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    I am a Respiratory Therapist and Polysomnographic Technologist. In the sleep lab, it is common to see people experiencing REM rebound. When they eventually wake up, they feel so tired it's like they have been beaten up.

    Nothing to worry, you will be fine. It will go away in time.

    By the way, I tend to feel that you are probably sleeping a bit too many hours. To give you an idea, if I sleep more than 7.5 hours on CPAP, then all next day I feel like I have been drugged, sort of.
     
  4. Valentino

    Valentino New Member

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    What I find unusual is that over the last couple of nights, I have been going to sleep around 9:00 or so and sleeping right into the day, like past nine. My CPAP shows mask use of 10.5 and 11.0 hrs during which I was really in deep sleep.

    From the way I am experiencing plenty weird dreams, I believe I am going through a REM rebound.

    The problem is when I wake up in the morning, I find myself in a kind of stupor, feeling all groggy. It's a fuzzy feeling even, that hangs on for hours together the next day.

    I heard that some people who have experienced REM sleep wake up to a fresh start, all alert and active. On the other hand, I also saw some forum posts that tell me some people have the same symptoms as I am now having.

    Is this effect common? If so, for how long will this last?
     
  5. Fergie Fulton

    Fergie Fulton New Member

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    To start with, practically every adult person needs at least eight hours of quality sleep every night. People who suffer from sleep apnea need to see that they get enough CPAP therapy to get that kind of sleep.

    From what you have stated, you definitely seem to be getting the amount of sleep you need, but it is likely that you are not getting quality sleep.

    When you are using your CPAP set to a pressure lower than required, or you have too much leakage, you may be experience some apnea events in spite of getting enough sleep. This very often happens when the working pressure is marginally insufficient.

    When you are going through the various stages of sleep and sleep cycles, you will be having longer and longer periods of REM sleep. Think of this as a period of paralysis. While this is happening, you could experience more server apnea events and events that last much longer. To prevent the events from occurring, you may have to increase the pressure sufficiently. These apnea events often occur between 3:00am and 5:00am.

    In the case of normal sleep, the various stages of sleep and sleep cycles last about hour or hour and half each time. In a sleep cycle, your sleep progresses through five different stages. Earlier cycles have longer earlier stages and in the later stages have longer REM stages.

    Sleep apnea disturbs your whole sleep architecture - rather than getting the right amounts of each kind of sleep, you end up getting too many early stages and too little of the restorative deep sleep and REM stages.

    The fact is that you are not really more groggy now than earlier but that you are now more aware of it and you are able to feel it. It just shows you are improving!

    Hope that helps.
     
  6. ApneaCrusher

    ApneaCrusher New Member

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    It is possible that the pressure is not sufficient for your needs of apnea treatment. In that case, you may have to get yourself tested once again. Ask your doctor and get an appointment for fresh sleep test.

    Your CPAP is not set to/ is unable to deliver the required pressure. Either that or the pressure is being lose due to leaks in the mask, the humidifier or the hose. Call your DME and ask for a session for testing your equipment.

    And what if your condition is caused by some sleep disorder that has nothing to do with your OSA? Have you thought about that?

    Good Luck.
     

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