Chaney Kley - death by sleep apnea

Discussion in 'Sleep Apnea & CPAP Users Forum' started by xnon, Sep 17, 2017.

  1. xnon

    xnon New Member

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    Was watching Legally Blonde (who does that in 2017, but am a big Reese Witherspoon fan, helps me forget my problems away watching her movies)…but cutting a long story short, was awed by Chaney Kley (he played Brandon), heard he was born near my place (Manassas, Virginia) and was shocked to know that he died in 2007 reportedly from sleep apnea…now, this might be dated news but was under the belief that sleep apnea would not be so fatal. He was so young, was not overweight, very active but still died….still not able to sink in that feeling. Wondering if sleep apnea can kill you?
     
  2. bl0p

    bl0p New Member

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    Yes, unfortunate indeed! Had a secret crush on him, was shell-shocked for few days after his death. I think his death leaves a critical message---never underestimate sleep apnea and if in doubt get yourself checked and do not neglect using CPAP machine….btw…I watched Legally Blonde more than a dozen times.
     
  3. richardD

    richardD New Member

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    The medical fraternity does not seem to take it very seriously, and routinely dismiss the lethal consequences stating there is no direct evidence for it. Even my nurse practitioner is very skeptical about it.
     
  4. kennedy

    kennedy New Member

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    Sleep apnea does not kill people by itself…it is the associated symptoms that can have fatal consequences. For instance, stroke and heart attack are significant factors in the death of people who have sleep apnea…since it taxes your body to pump more air into body…also, mild sleep apnea can also result in people falling asleep behind wheels and ending up in major accidents and get killed….so in short complications from sleep apnea usually kill a person…
     
  5. Harry

    Harry New Member

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    Thanks for the info @kennedy. Would like to share my experience

    My wife was around 35 when she became pregnant and had palpitations, was very sleepy during the day, bouts of depression…I informed her OB about it, and he just said it is complications from pregnancy. We believed him and thanks to Almighty, she delivered a healthy boy. But she still kept having these symptoms, so we went to see a new OB who straightway asked her to get a sleep study done and she indeed was having sleep apnea..the OB said she was lucky she got alive through the pregnancy and the baby was healthy. Thanxz to him, she was diagnosed, otherwise who knows what would have happened…I think sleep apnea is still an underdiagnosed disease and since the symptoms often mimic symptoms of other diseases, even the doctors are not sure about it…
     
  6. goo

    goo New Member

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    Well, I would say doctors are either ignorant of it or are too proud to admit they do not know how to handle this disease…my case..I was surfing channels when in one channel an NHL player (I’m big Jonathan Toews fan) was stating how he was having issues with sleep during the daytime and how he was tired all the time, etc. and that he was diagnosed with sleep apnea and had to quit the sport…when it struck me even, I have all these symptoms (plus am overweight). Concerned, I went to my MD who said, “Do not worry about these, maybe you are working too much and not having a proper sleep (which was true) hence you are getting these,”…but I stuck to my concern and grudgingly he got an appointment with a sleep doctor. I went there, and he looks at me and says “I am pretty sure your sleep study would turn out to be positive for sleep apnea” turns out I have sleep apnea….

    I think more than doctors we should be prepared ourselves and ask our family members if we exhibit these symptoms and if yes, we should get ourselves treated.
     

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