Can Deviated Septum Cause Sleep Apnea

Discussion in 'Sleep Apnea & CPAP Users Forum' started by Gregor, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Gregor

    Gregor New Member

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    Hello everyone

    In January of this year, I was diagnosed with OSA with 33 AHI and 79% O2 saturation. Was prescribed CPAP and I used it for some 2 months max…I was just not able to adjust to it. I went to see an ENT for getting a dental device (suggested by my husband), but the ENT checked me and told it would be better if I undergo a surgery since my nasal septum has deviated. I asked him for some time and went to another sleep tech who did a sleep study and said I have OSA and it would be better if I started using CPAP and not undergo surgery if the septum has not deviated very significantly…now I am caught between the devil and deep sea..on one hand I want to undergo surgery, but on the other hand, I am wondering what if the operation is not helpful…BTW I was told I had long and thick tongue ( my husband says I have got sharp tongue)


    Any help regarding septum surgery would be useful. Also, how do I know if I have got deviated septum?


    Thanks
     
  2. captmdb

    captmdb New Member

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    Hey there…welcome to the forum.


    First of all surgery and OSA…I am not sure it is always beneficial…the success rate is around 45 -50% and I believe if surgery cannot give a success guarantee of more than 90% for the money spent, then better not to get the surgery done…first things first..which model was given to you and what was the pressure setting and was the mask an issue which made your CPAP experience unbearable…and did you go through all the settings…there are many settings which can make us more comfortable..try that…also if you have an issue with nasal breathing then I would suggest you ask your ENT to give a steroid spray since it can be very useful, especially if the deviation is caused due to a sinus infection.


    I would suggest you keep the option of surgery to the last and if possible get a second opinion.
     
  3. shole

    shole New Member

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    Just wanted to know why the ENT suggested surgery,..is it because of OSA or some other issue…if it is for OSA then I am not sure about it since many studies have shown that OSA and surgery usually do not get along well and the success rate is less than 50 %...I have few friends who underwent surgery, and when they went for sleep study, their OSA was still there…If your ENT has asked for surgery for other reason, then probably it will help you in enlarging your options for masks...

    I not a trained doctor, so I would suggest always go for medical advice. In case you feel uncomfortable with your ENT take a second opinion and if that doctor also recommends the same, then go for it. With regards to the large tongue, as long as it is not bothering you…do not think about it.
     
  4. dr

    dr New Member

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    I underwent surgery for turbinates and deviated septum, and I am feeling a lot better but have a very little change in OSA…so unless you are very sure about the need for surgery, better not to go for it…seems ridiculous to have surgery for either reducing or eliminating CPAP use.
     
  5. getwithit

    getwithit New Member

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    I agree with all the posts that undergoing surgery for correcting septum is a good thing but specifically for OSA is plain stupidity. I was having highly obstructed breathing and was a mouth breather since my childhood….frankly, my childhood days were spent running to ENT and taking antibiotics for various infections, (turbinates, adenoids, tonsils)…After I grew up, I changed my GP, and he gave me allergy shots since I started having sinus infections and after we exhausted all options, he asked me to undergo surgery to reduce my turbinates and remove my adenoids and tonsils ( pretty late for that it seems…I am 35 now underwent surgery when I was 32)

    I underwent these surgeries and then took a CT scan.,..showed my sinuses were clear, and I started breathing normally with no mouth breathing.

    But my sleep apnea has been there all the time…AHI of 28 and O2 Sat of 89%

    So cutting long story short..surgery for OSA…I would not recommend but as others have said if you have any other problems then better undergo surgery. For OSA, I would suggest trying new machine and masks and let the body get adjusted to it..may take some time, but it is far better than going under the knife.
     
  6. westmixxin

    westmixxin New Member

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    Well everybody talked about surgery, but I will answer your other question—how do you know if you have deviated septum…it is very simple

    Use your forefinger or thumb and block off one nostril and trying breathing through the open nostril for 1 minute….if you are unable to do so then you have deviated septum, and it is suggested you undergo surgery. As for surgery…if you have blocked nose then I am not sure any CPAP would be helpful…and as you have mentioned you have a thick tongue, surgery can reduce it, but I do not know if it would help your sleep apnea.

    BTW having an FFM is not answer to a clogged nose and mouth breathing is NOT normal.
     
  7. doug9694

    doug9694 New Member

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    I am not sure why @westmixxin feels full face mask would not be helpful…it is designed for enabling people having sleep-disordered breathing and less than ideal nasal breathing …to use CPAP and have better breathing.so I think it would be useful.
     
  8. westmixxin

    westmixxin New Member

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    Well, it may be useful but it is mainly like applying a band-aid on a wound which needs surgery..and moreover, since @Gregor has large tongue also…with FFM on, chances of tongue obstructing the airway and breathing become more labored with one effective nostril is very high.
     
  9. zimbalen

    zimbalen New Member

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    On a different note, I do not have OSA, but my experience with septoplasty is less than pleasant. I underwent septoplasty in 2000 and what was supposed to be a simple day procedure ended up being a procedure which made me stay in the hospital for one week. Fast forward to June 2017, my dog headbutted me (of all the livings beings on the planet…btw my dog is a German Shepherd), and my ENT suggested septoplasty….I told her, “Sorry lady, been there done that, No thanks.”

    So, septoplasty is not always a success, and in case of sleep apnea, I would rather place a wager on Trump accepting Obamacare than on septoplasty treating sleep apnea.
     
  10. Gregor

    Gregor New Member

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    Thanks for all the advice and experiences…I think I would try to reduce my weight (I’m 195 lbs would try to bring to 175 lbs) and ask for more options for CPAP machines and learn new features. Would that help?
     
  11. Mark922

    Mark922 New Member

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    Yes, try every option and go for surgery once you have exhausted all your options. Hope you achieve your goal and do not have to undergo surgery.

    God bless.
     

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